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Tax

How to Reduce Tax Liability

How to reduce tax liability

Income tax preparers know costs and expenses are crucial part of Income tax planning, and one of the most difficult. How to reduce tax liability is contingent on what deductions you can claim.

How to reduce tax liability as allowable deductions as incurred and paid. These are not mutually exclusive.  Income tax preparers when trying to answer the age old question “How to reduce tax liability” and during the Income tax planning phase must consider what was spent for the purpose business deduction, and most importantly, what was not spent but incurred. How to reduce tax liability questions must be asked and answered during the Income tax planning period.

How to reduce tax liability via Income tax planning

To be allowable, it must not be excluded by regulations (see beneath).

The decision maker ought to often consider every single product of cost independently.

Income tax preparers Expenditures Check List

These are:

a) Funds expenditure

b) Repayments of cash on financial loans taken out for company reasons

c) Depreciation of capital assets

d) Sums utilized, or supposed to be employed, in setting up or growing a organization

e) Losses incurred prior to the start of the evaluation period

f)   Costs incurred in providing organization enjoyment.

These are the unofficial guidelines recommended by Income tax preparers during Income tax planning on how to reduce tax liability. It is totally important that you communicate to your Income tax preparers just before you allow or disallow any enterprise bills.

As lengthy as the ailments in the first paragraph are fulfilled, these are the day-to-day bills of a business you can deduct:

Accountancy costs

Marketing

Cleansing of organization premises

Big difference between opening and closing stock (on accounts)

Workers wages just before any deductions are made, including any wages payable to the domestic companion

Employer’s contributions to employees’ pension scheme

Employer’s (secondary) Class 1 SS contributions

Heating and lighting

Hire or rental costs (but not any cash or purchase elements)

Curiosity payable under a credit sale, a consumer credit score arrangement or a retain the services of obtain arrangement (but not the cash aspect of payments)

Authorized expenses connected with the enterprise

Payment in variety for perform carried out for the enterprise – the financial worth is allowable

Rent and Rates

Stationery

Stock purchases

Sundries, sometimes known as miscellaneous things, which are modest in relation to complete allowable costs provided that the decision make is content that no non-allowable expenses, for case in point for company enjoyment, are incorporated

Telephone, telex, fax etc (Only the proportion that is used for enterprise, i.e. if you use your telephone thirty% for company, 70% for private, then you can declare 30% of the costs as an allowable expense)

Transportation excluding any home-to-operate costs

VAT allowable (two)

Clearly, expenditures is a large area of tax far too huge to cover in a solitary web site publish, so if you need to know much more about expenditures, just take us up on our Cost-free one Hour Consultation.

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Tax

How to Reduce Tax Liability with New IRS Penalty Relief and Installment Agreements

How to Reduce Tax Liability with New IRS Penalty Relief and Installment Agreements

Reduce tax liability — The Internal Revenue Service today announced a major expansion of its “Fresh Start” initiative to help struggling taxpayers to reduce tax liability by taking steps to provide new penalty relief to the unemployed and making Installment Agreements available to more people.

Under the new Fresh Start provisions on how to reduce tax liability, part of a broader effort started at the IRS in 2008 which aided taxpayers to reduce tax liability, certain taxpayers who have been unemployed for 30 days or longer will be able to avoid failure-to-pay penalties. In addition, the IRS is doubling the dollar threshold for taxpayers eligible to reduce tax liability with Installment Agreements to help more people qualify for the program.

“We have an obligation to work with taxpayers who are struggling to make ends meet,” said IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman. ”This new approach makes sense for taxpayers and for the nation’s tax system, and it’s part of a wider effort we have underway to help struggling taxpayers to reduce tax liability.”

Reduce tax liability with Penalty Relief

The IRS announced plans for new penalty relief on how to reduce tax liability for the unemployed on failure-to-pay penalties, which are one of the biggest factors a financially distressed taxpayer faces on a tax bill.

To assist those most in need to reduce tax liability, a six-month grace period on failure-to-pay penalties will be made available to certain wage earners and self-employed individuals in order to reduce tax liability. The request for an extension of time to pay will result in relief from the failure to pay penalty for tax year 2011 only if the tax, interest and any other penalties are fully paid by Oct. 15, 2012.

How to reduce tax liability using the penalty relief will be available to two categories of taxpayers:

•             Wage earners who have been unemployed at least 30 consecutive days during 2011 or in 2012 up to the April 17 deadline for filing a federal tax return this year.

•             Self-employed individuals who experienced a 25 percent or greater reduction in business income in 2011 due to the economy.

Reduce tax liability using penalty relief is subject to income limits. A taxpayer’s income must not exceed $200,000 if he or she files as married filing jointly or not exceed $100,000 if he or she files as single or head of household. Reduce tax liability penalty relief is also restricted to taxpayers whose calendar year 2011 balance due does not exceed $50,000.

Taxpayers meeting the eligibility criteria will need to complete a new Form 1127A to seek the 2011 How to reduce tax liability penalty relief. The new form is available on IRS.gov.

The failure-to-pay penalty is generally half of 1 percent per month with an upper limit of 25 percent. Under this new relief on reducing tax liability taxpayers can avoid that penalty until Oct. 15, 2012, which is six months beyond this year’s filing deadline. However, the IRS is still legally required to charge interest on unpaid back taxes and does not have the authority to waive this charge, which is currently 3 percent on an annual basis.

Even with the new penalty relief becoming available, the IRS strongly encourages taxpayers to file their returns on time by April 17 or file for an extension. Failure-to-file penalties applied to unpaid taxes remain in effect and are generally 5 percent per month, also with a 25 percent cap.

Reduce tax liability with Installment Agreements

The Fresh Start provisions also mean that more taxpayers will have the ability to use streamlined installment agreements to catch up on back taxes.

The IRS announced today that, effective immediately, the threshold for using an installment agreement without having to supply the IRS with a financial statement has been raised from $25,000 to $50,000. This is a significant reduction in taxpayer burden.

Taxpayers who owe up to $50,000 in back taxes will now be able to enter into a streamlined agreement with the IRS that stretches the payment out over a series of months or years. The maximum term for streamlined installment agreements has also been raised to 72 months from the current 60-month maximum.

Taxpayers seeking installment agreements exceeding $50,000 will still need to supply the IRS with a Collection Information Statement (Form 433-A or Form 433-F). Taxpayers may also pay down their balance due to $50,000 or less to take advantage of this payment option.

An installment agreement is an option for those who cannot pay their entire tax bills by the due date. Penalties are reduced, although interest continues to accrue on the outstanding balance. In order to qualify for the new expanded streamlined installment agreement, a taxpayer must agree to monthly direct debit payments.

Taxpayers can set up an installment agreement with the IRS by going to the On-line Payment Agreement (OPA) page on IRS.gov and following the instructions.

These changes supplement a number of efforts to help struggling taxpayers, including the “Fresh Start” program announced last year. The initiative includes a variety of changes to help individuals and businesses pay back taxes more easily and with less burden, including the issuance of fewer tax liens.

“Our goal is to help people meet their obligations and get back on their feet financially,” Shulman said.

Input from the Internal Revenue Service Advisory Council and the IRS National Taxpayer Advocate’s office contributed to the formulation of Fresh Start.

Offers in Compromise

Under the first round of Fresh Start, the IRS expanded a new streamlined Offer in Compromise (OIC) program to cover a larger group of struggling taxpayers. An offer-in-compromise is an agreement between a taxpayer and the IRS that settles the taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed.

The IRS recognizes that many taxpayers are still struggling to pay their bills so the agency has been working to put in place more common-sense changes to the OIC program to more closely reflect real-world situations.

For example, the IRS has more flexibility with financial analysis for determining reasonable collection potential for distressed taxpayers.

Generally, an offer will not be accepted if the IRS believes that the liability can be paid in full as a lump sum or through a payment agreement. The IRS looks at the taxpayer’s income and assets to make a determination regarding the taxpayer’s ability to pay.

Details on IRS Collection and Other Information

A series of eight short videos are available to familiarize taxpayers and practitioners with the IRS collection process. The series “Owe Taxes? Understanding IRS Collection Efforts”, is available on the IRS website, www.irs.gov.

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Tax

Tax Services TaxMasters Bankruptcy Shows Why Not To Get Help From TV Pitchmen if You Owe The IRS

Tax Services TaxMasters Bankruptcy Shows Why Not To Get Help From TV Pitchmen if You Owe The IRS

Tax Services Miami CPA Firm Gustavo A Viera says if you’ve got problems paying the Internal Revenue Service, don’t look for help from the ads on late night cable television from TV Pitchmen promising to reduce tax liabilityReducing tax liability, that’s one of the lessons from an SEC filing Friday by TaxMasters Inc., disclosing the publicly-traded company will file for voluntary bankruptcy.  As ABC reported last April, even after Tax Services Houston-based TaxMasters had been accused of deceptive business practices by the attorneys general of Texas and Minnesota, it continued to buy millions of advertising on CNN, FoxNews and other cable channels Pitchmen promising to reduce tax liability for pennies on the dollar. The ads featured Patrick Cox, the red-bearded TaxMasters CEO, assuring potential clients that his staff of tax pros, including former IRS agents, had helped “many good people just like you.”

According to TaxMaster’s three page filing in the Southern Texas bankruptcy court, it has less than $5,000 in assets and up to 5,000 creditors.

Tax Services Miami VieraCPA notes this is just the latest bankruptcy by a “tax resolution” Tax Services that advertised heavily—and made allegedly exaggerated claims–on cable TV.  JK Harris & Co., a South Carolina-based firm which once operated hundreds of locations in dozens of states, filed for bankruptcy last October after being sued by both states and unhappy customers. Last December, it ceased operations and went into liquidation, leaving 5,400 active clients in the lurch.   Harris’ former clients, including those who won legal judgments against it, aren’t likely to see any money from the liquidation. (Another firm, Resolute Tax Services, has purchased access to JK Harris’ customer list; according to the privacy terms set by the bankruptcy court, customers must contact Resolute and agree to the transfer of their files, at which point Resolute says it will offer them a “credit of up to 50%” of the fees they paid JK Harris.)

In 2010, California Attorney General (now Governor) Jerry Brown  sued “Tax Lady” Roni Deutch, who also had a big presence on TV, claiming she “engaged in a scheme to swindle taxpayers” by overstating the ability of her tax services firm to gain concessions from the IRS. Deutch called the charges politically motivated. But last year, she  filed for bankruptcy and  surrendered her law license.

If you’ve got problems with the IRS, here are a few pointers—that you won’t get from a Tax Services cable pitchman.

• Tax Services CPA Firm Gustavo A Viera says some people do win “offer in compromise” deals from the IRS allowing them to settle what they owe for “pennies on the dollar”—but only those who genuinely can’t pay, when all their assets and future earnings are taken into account. In fiscal 2010, the IRS received 57,000 applications for OICs and granted only 14,000 of them, according to its annual data book.

• CPA VieraCPA notes that if you can pay what you owe the IRS over time, you may be able to work out a deal without paying big bucks to a tax pro. Earlier this month, as part of a bid to help strapped taxpayers, the IRS announced that taxpayers owing up to $50,000 in back taxes, interest and penalties (up from $25,000) can enter into a streamlined installment agreement to pay over up to 72 months–without supplying the IRS with a detailed financial statement. Be careful, however, not to sign an installment agreement unless you’re reasonably certain you can live up to.

•If you believe you are being treated unfairly by the IRS and can’t get anyone to listen to you, there is an independent office within the IRS —known as the Taxpayer Advocate Service—that may be able to intervene or call Tax Services CPA Firm Gustavo A Viera

•If you need professional help, choose carefully.  If you’re in deep trouble with the IRS, you’ll generally want to hire a lawyer, a CPA or an enrolled agent, who is licensed to practice before the IRS.